Fish in a Barrel, LLC

Fish in a Barrel is a security research organization, dedicated to combining the laziest techniques with high impact targets. In short: we're shooting fish in a barrel.

With decades of combined experience in security research, we deliver top results for our clients.

Our research staff

Alex Gaynor

Alex Gaynor

Alex is a principal security researcher and founder of Fish in a Barrel, LLC. He occasionally does security research that requires actual effort, but prefers not to.

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Paul Kehrer

Paul Kehrer

Paul is a long-time fan of poorly written software, having developed it his entire career. When not writing fuzzers he can be found crawling back under the rock he came from.

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Jonathan Rudenberg

Jonathan Rudenberg

Jonathan never intended to be a security researcher, but that changed when they almost got sued for accidentally discovering a flaw in a major cloud provider. Since that day, Jonathan has continued to accidentally find bugs, and occasionally modifies build systems that no one understands as part of the futile fight against solved bugclasses.

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Tim Smith

Tim Smith

Tim is literally a biologist. Once we made it clear that "fuzzing" was not the same as "letting mold take over your culture" he caught on pretty quickly.

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Chris Wolfe

Chris Wolfe

Chris was immediately hooked on writing fuzzers when he noticed that they produce enormous amounts of logs and crash programs.

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Nelson Elhage

Nelson Elhage

Nelson used to find security bugs the old-fashioned way, by actually reading source code. Once he realized that oss-fuzz was a lot easier he renounced his "doing actual work" ways for good.

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Your Name Here

Your Name Here!

Fish in a Barrel is looking to grow and diversify our team of security researchers. Do you like doing security research that could be entirely eliminated by better tools? Consider joining!

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Memory unsafety + fuzzing = Fish in a Barrel

We leverage cutting edge fuzzing engines like libFuzzer and AFL to target known-unsafe programming languages like C and C++ to maximize our findings. Hundreds of CVEs, almost no effort.

Sometimes we also type <script>alert()</script> into websites.


High impact targets

We target security-critical projects such as ImageMagick, GraphicsMagick, ClamAV, and GnuTLS to maximize our impact.

We've probably found vulnerabilities in something you use.


We get results

Look at all these vulnerabilities.

There's no way we'd be this productive if we had to do real work for each vulnerability.


Please put us out of business

Stop writing C/C++.

Probably you should also sandbox your software.


NewPhish in a Barrel

Stop sending your employees test phishing emails. Everybody clicks on them all the time.

Use phishing resistant authentication instead. Seriously, buy all your employees security keys.